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The Power of the Word

The Power of the Word

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​By Iwan Sadler

​Words can be powerful when spoken or in thought. Words are used on so many different levels from the expression of your thoughts to the decision you will make within the moment.Peace is delivered with words but also wars are started by the spoken or written word.

We choose our life choices on words. The average person can speak between 125 and 150 words a minute, but the rate of “expanded inner speech! (word-for-word) is slightly faster than verbal speech. That puts into perspective how many words enter our train of thought on a daily basis. Some decisions can sometimes be made in seconds – other decisions take a lot longer. One thing is for certain: they are all decided with words. 

With the technological development of the internet and mobile phones, words are used more now than ever. The average person uses their mobile phone for approximately four hours per day and around 18.7 billion text messages are sent around the world on a daily basis. And we can’t forget the amount of words we use on our social media platforms. I think you’ll agree that’s a great quantity of words.

This just shows how important words are for our social integration and how powerful words can be. They say that concurring thoughts will eventually become your actions so should we be careful at what we think? Many people think that words, once spoken, cannot be taken back and the action of those words, even if they were delivered within seconds, will last and echo for a lot longer. 
So should we be more careful with what we choose to say? Do words really cut deeper than a knife and leave longer lasting invisible scars? Could our words to a situation decide the overall reactive decision to a situation? Can our words totally change a decision within a scenario? The answer is “Yes!” Our action will always lead to a reaction and the outcome will always depend on our words.

“Where are you going with all this?” you may ask and “What has this got to do with living with a chronic condition?” Could the words we think and use every day help us deal with our condition? Remember that the actual words you say matter, not just the thoughts you convey. Try to use more positive words on a daily basis even if you are unable to replace negative words with positive ones, try replacing them with more accurate neutral ones. Instead of, “This chair is horrible”, try“This chair is not for me.”

Try not to use absolutes, especially in relation to your goals, where falling short of your expectations can be particularly depressing. These words and phrases include: “always”, “never”, “nothing” – the list goes on. Replace them with nuance. Instead of, “I can walk that far”, try “Sometimes I can’t walk that far”.

So the key is to think and speak in a more positive manner. Positive thinking often starts with self-talk. Self-talk is the endless stream of unspoken thoughts that run through your head. These automatic thoughts can be positive or negative. Some of your self-talk comes from logic and reason. Other self-talk may arise from misconceptions that you create because of lack of information.

Positive thinking doesn’t mean that you keep your head in the sand and ignore life’s less pleasant situations. Positive thinking just means that you approach unpleasantness in a more positive and productive way. You think the best is going to happen, not the worst.

The Health Benefits of Positive Thinking
Researchers continue to explore the effects of positive thinking and optimism on health. Health benefits that positive thinking may provide include:

  • Increased life span
  • Lower rates of depression
  • Lower levels of distress
  • Greater resistance to the common cold
  • Better psychological and physical well-being
  • Better cardiovascular health and reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease
  • Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress

You can learn to turn negative thinking into positive thinking. The process is simple, but it does take time and practice – you’re creating a new habit, after all.

If you are looking for another way to relieve discomfort that doesn’t involve drugs, some age-old techniques – including meditation and yoga as well as newer variations, may help reduce your need for pain medication.
Research suggests that because pain involves both the mind and the body, mind-body therapies may have the capacity to alleviate pain by changing the way you perceive it. How you feel pain is influenced by your genetic makeup, emotions, personality, and lifestyle. It’s also influenced by past experience. If you’ve been in pain for a while, your brain may have rewired itself to perceive pain signals even after the signals aren’t being sent any more. Stress and pain are tightly connected and can have a strong influence on each other. Therefore, if positive thinking is able to counter some of the effects of chronic stress, it could also help lower pain levels.


Practising  Positive Thinking Every Day
If you tend to have a negative outlook, don’t expect to become an optimist overnight. But with practice, eventually your self-talk will contain less self-criticism and more self-acceptance. You may also become less critical of the world around you.

When your state of mind is generally optimistic, you’re better able to handle everyday stress in a more constructive way. That ability may contribute to the widely observed health benefits of positive thinking.

​Final Thought
Being careful with our self talk is essential for our own. wellbeing. And we can also take care to avoid ill-considered words that could damage the wellbeing of others. 
Our minds too often seem to be programmed to keep recalling and dwelling on negative comments which drown out or dismiss any positive feedback we have received. 

The tongue is the strongest muscle in the human body so be careful on how you use it may it be online by txt or word of mouth because “words can only be forgiven not forgotten”.

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